Settle & Carlilse Revival

The Line that Refused to Die

Brian Sharpe

The Settle & Carlisle railway runs across the roof of England, reaching the highest point on any main line railway in the country. Today it carries a frequent and well-patronised passenger service and considerable heavy long-distance freight traffic.
Date Published :
August 2021
Publisher :
Mortons Books
Illustration :
200
Format Available    QuantityPrice
Binding : Hardback
ISBN : 9781911658542
Pages : 144
Dimensions : 9.8 X 7.5 inches
Stock Status : Not Yet Published. Available for Pre-Order
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$22.99

Overview
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The Settle & Carlisle railway runs across the roof of England, reaching the highest point on any main line railway in the country. Today it carries a frequent and well-patronized passenger service and considerable heavy long-distance freight traffic.

The line has been fortunate enough to survive two attempts to close it and in fact should probably never have been built at all.

There could now be a 72-mile abandoned trackbed passing through such places as Blea Moor, over Dent Head and Arten Gill viaducts and the legendary Ais Gill summit, but sufficient people felt strongly enough to campaign successfully to stop this happening and keep one of Britain’s favorite railway lines open.

Since the line won a second reprieve in 1989, after an eight-year battle, train services have been expanded. In fact they were expanding even while it plans were in place to close the line, but saving it was not the end of the story – it was just the beginning.

This is the story of the revival in the fortunes of the Settle & Carlisle. Many closed stations have reopened and restored to their former glory, freight traffic has returned and steam-hauled excursions over the line have gone from strength to strength.

About The Author
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Brian Sharpe was born and bred in Peterborough situated on the East Coast Main Line north of King’s Cross. He still remembers clearly the LNER Pacifics which worked the expresses on the main line through the city, although by the age of ten they had been replaced by the new diesels. The sight of A3 Pacific No. 4472 Flying Scotsman running light engine towards London in 1963 after its purchase by Alan Pegler was very much a sign of what the future would hold. Brian has since followed the engine on much of its travels not only in all parts of the British Isles but even on its trip to Australia. For many years a volunteer on the Nene Valley Railway, Brian’s career included working as deputy editor of Heritage Railway magazine between 2002 and 2018.