BR Standard Revival

BR Standard Revival

Brian Sharpe

This bookazine is the fifth and final of the series. The previous bookazines covered the Great Western Railway, Southern Railway, LMS and LNER, including engines inherited by those ‘Big Four' companies in 1923.
Date Published :
December 2020
Publisher :
Mortons Books
Format Available    QuantityPrice
Binding : Paperback
ISBN : 9781911639428
Pages : 132
Dimensions : 11.6 X 8.3 inches
Stock Status : Not Yet Published. Available for Pre-Order
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$11.99

Overview
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This bookazine is the fifth and final of the series. The previous bookazines covered the Great Western Railway, Southern Railway, LMS and LNER, including engines inherited by those ‘Big Four’ companies in 1923. This one will cover the locomotives built by British Railways after nationalization in 1948, all designed by Robert Riddles, who was a steam enthusiast himself and probably extended the steam age in Britain for longer than he should have. It contains detailed information on the locomotives’ histories which is surprisingly not readily available elsewhere. On January 1, 1948 the railways were nationalized; the four chief mechanical engineers were out of their jobs; the new man at the helm of British Railways’ locomotive design was Robert Riddles.

Riddles could have decided to adopt existing designs of various types of locomotive for continued ongoing construction but he embarked on a program of entirely new designs for various types of traffic. In three years he oversaw the introduction of 999 engines of no less than 12 ‘standard’ classes of steam engines, which should have been able to cope with all types of traffic across the whole system. When the phenomenon of steam preservation exploded on to the scene as steam quickly vanished in the late 1960s, BR Standard designs were not generally particularly appealing to preservationists and only a handful had been preserved by the end of BR steam in August 1968. A significant number found their way to Dai Woodham’s scrapyard at Barry though and most of these were eventually preserved and many have returned to steam. Forty-five locomotives of Riddles’ BR Standard designs now survive, representing eight of the 12 designs, and they are useful and popular engines. This is the story of all those engines and the individuals and organizations which saved them, restored them, and continue to operate them.

About The Author
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Brian Sharpe was born and bred in Peterborough situated on the East Coast Main Line north of King’s Cross. He still remembers clearly the LNER Pacifics which worked the expresses on the main line through the city, although by the age of ten they had been replaced by the new diesels. The sight of A3 Pacific No. 4472 Flying Scotsman running light engine towards London in 1963 after its purchase by Alan Pegler was very much a sign of what the future would hold. Brian has since followed the engine on much of its travels not only in all parts of the British Isles but even on its trip to Australia. For many years a volunteer on the Nene Valley Railway, Brian’s career included working as deputy editor of Heritage Railway magazine between 2002 and 2018.