With Napoleon at St Helena

John Stokoe

 
Date Published :
June 2017
Publisher :
Fonthill Media
Language:
English
Illustration :
black and white photos
Format Available    QuantityPrice
Paperback
ISBN : 9781781554609
Pages : 128
Dimensions : 9 X 6 inches
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In stock
$28.95

Overview
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Nearing the end of his career as a ship surgeon, he agreed in 1817 to take a three year posting to St Helena. Stokoe set out for St Helena on HMS Conqueror in 1817. At St Helena there was discord following the Governor, Lieutenant-General Sir Hudson Lowe's controversial decision to dismiss Napoleon's doctor, Barry O'Mara. About this time, Napoleon asked that Mr Stokoe, who had once attended him and who he understood was returning to St Helena, might attend him again ‘or would the Governor authorise some other English doctor to come, providing he sign similar conditions as had been accepted by Stokoe in the past.' Immediately after, Mr Stokoe arrived at St Helena, was put under arrest and tried on varying counts—seven in all. The whole was found proven. The third indictment read, ‘That he had signed a paper purporting to be a bulletin of General Bonaparte's health, and divulged the same to the General and his attendants contrary to orders,' and the seventh, ‘That he had contrary to his duty, and the character of a British Naval Officer, communicated to General Bonaparte or his attendant an infamous and calumnious imputation cast upon Lieutenant-General Sir Hudson Lowe. etc. by Barry O'Meara, late surgeon in the Royal Navy' (also now dismissed) ‘implying that Sir Hudson Lowe had practised with the said O'Meara to induce him to put an end to the existence of General Bonaparte.' Stokoe, though dismissed the Navy, was put on half-pay. At Stokoe's treatment Napoleon, enraged, refused the future services of British doctors. This book is Stokoe's own defence, another book with damning evidence against the notorious Governor—Sir Hudson Lowe.

About The Author
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Dr John Stokoe, (1775-1852). Stokoe set out for St Helena on HMS Conqueror in 1817. ‘I thought that I should see the great man and probably have the honour of conversing with him—little did I think at that time that the honour would be so dearly purchased!’ He married late in life, but was predeceased by his wife and two daughters. He died of a stroke in 1852. This edition was edited by another daughter, Edith Stokoe.

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