Wealth without Cost. Volume 2

White Alchemy in Religion and the Arts

Barry Bracewell-Milnes

Published to widespread acclaim in the United Kingdom, the first volume of this important work examined the nature and creation of wealth, arguing that the "costless wealth" of human ingenuity - loyalty, charity, altruism and freedom - is more fundamental to prosperity than state intervention. Volume 2 extends the argument to religion and the arts.
Date Published :
March 2014
Publisher :
University of Buckingham Press
Language:
English
Format Available    QuantityPrice
Hardback
ISBN : 9780956071699

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In stock
$50.00

Overview
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Published to widespread acclaim in the United Kingdom, the first volume of this important work examined the nature and creation of wealth, arguing that the "costless wealth" of human ingenuity - loyalty, charity, altruism and freedom - is more fundamental to prosperity than state intervention. Volume Two extends the argument to religion and the arts. By contrast with what is widely believed, economics, religion and the arts are structurally similar orders for the creation of value. Value can be created by the primary activities of entrepreneurs, prophets and artists and through the secondary activities of stewards and critics; and the process extends to tertiary value creation by consumers. Costless wealth creation makes better use of what already exists. It can operate through the improvement of institutions or through the workings of the individual mind.

REVIEWS
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"This is the second volume of two-volume work examining the concept of costless inputs to wealth creation. Costless inputs are scarce, create value, cannot be purchased, and, the author argues, must be nurtured by free institutions relying on the voluntary principle and eschewing coercion. Examples he gives are loyalty, saving in perpetuity, giving, proprietary appropriation, stewardship, altruism, and freedom. He opposes freedom to state control, equality, and political correctness, which he argues have undue economic costs. This second volume extends the argument beyond economics to religion (Christianity) and the arts, which are similar creators of costless wealth, he writes."

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