Art

Items 31 to 40 of 91 total

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  • Emily Andersen – Portraits: Black & White

    Emily Andersen has been making photographic portraits of the international avant-garde since graduating from the Royal College of Art in the early 1980s. Having started out by finding her way into some pretty cool-sounding private parties in London and New York, she began convincing artists and musicians to pose for her – from Nan Goldin to Nico. Over the past thirty-five years, she has built up a remarkable and beautiful portfolio that includes many high-profile writers, poets, film directors, actors, and architects, with Peter Blake, Michael Caine, Derek Jarman, Zaha... Learn More
  • Caroline Walker

    Celebrated for her beautiful, sometimes playful yet often challenging and complex paintings of contemporary women in diverse architectural settings, both interior and exterior, Caroline Walker’s practice explores the myriad social, cultural, economic, racial, and political factors that affect women’s lives today. From the luxurious hotels and private homes typical of Los Angeles and Palm Springs to the temporary social housing of female asylum seekers arriving in Europe from Africa and Asia, from the nail bars of London to the private pools and nighttime parties... Learn More
  • Break Boundary

    “Break Boundary” refers to the transformative point at which any system suddenly and irrevocably changes from its original state into something new. Coined by Kenneth E. Boulding in 1963, the term serves as the underlying metaphor for the photographs of Jenee Mateer. In her original works of art, the horizon that divides land, water, and sky shifts and multiplies producing bands of varied colors and luminosity that transform the natural landscape into imaginative “waterscapes” and challenge our understanding of photography. Reminiscent of the abstrac... Learn More
  • The Anomie Review of Contemporary British Painting

    There has been a huge injection of energy within contemporary painting in Britain in the past few years––part of a wider international dynamic that has seen the medium of paint explored with a renewed sense of interest, excitement, and enjoyment. It is an energy that can be sensed all the way through the industry, from the art schools and the grass-roots painting community to the leading galleries, major museums, and prominent festivals and fairs. The Anomie Review of Contemporary British Painting co... Learn More
  • 18th Century Colour Palettes

    Pigments described by the English chemist, Robert Dossie, the French artists' colourman, Jean Félix Watin, and the London-based pigment maker, Constant de Massoul. 18th century European painting saw the introduction of new pigments to the painters’ palettes, from Prussian Blue to the early synthetics such as Patent Yellow. It was a century rich in pigments, the authors of the treatises listing over 150 pigments that could be bought in the shops in London and Paris. Learn More
  • Kazimir Malevich: Suprematism

    A facsimile edition of Kazimir Malevich, SUPREMATISM 34 Drawings, was published in 1990 by Artists Bookworks accompanied by an introduction to the drawings by Patricia Railing; it is now out-of-print. This 2014 reprint of Malevich’s little book contains a new translation from the Russian and a new introductory text by Patricia Railing, “Reading the 34 Drawings”. The Russian text and plates were scanned from an original copy and the size of this little book conforms to the lithographed Russian edition of 1920. Learn More
  • Malevich Writes

    Collection of 30 texts, 1915-1928, & 3 facsimiles, some in first English translation, plus Nina Kogan on Cubism and Ilya Chashnik on Suprematism. Chronological sections trace Malevich’s analyses of Cubism and Futurism, the Supremus Society of Artists, Suprematism Triumphant, UNOVIS, Theory of Creativity as Artistic Culture, and the Non-Objective World of Sensations. A presentation of sensations from Cézanne to Suprematism is followed by a discussion of how consciousness and the environment influence artistic creativity in P. Railing, Malevich on Creativity.... Learn More
  • 17th Century Colour Palettes

    Ten 17th century writers described the pigments in use in their countries – England, Sweden, Flanders, France, Spain, and Italy. The theme of their treatises was studio practice and the pigments were discussed as they were set on the palette. Surprisingly, the method was the same – from light to dark, white to black. The 17th century palette was an international palette comprising just over 100 pigments.

    This book will be of interest to art historians, collectors, students, conservators, and museum-goers.
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  • 16th Century Colour Palettes

    Three texts by two Italian Renaissance painters – Leonardo da Vinci and Gian Paolo Lomazzo – and a compendium of the 53 standard pigments commonly found on artists' palettes for painting in oil on panel and on canvas as outlined by the writer, Raffaello Borghini, make up this 16th century collection of pigments. Leonardo's studio advice on the use of colors for capturing light and dark picks up this theme from Italian 15th century and classical painting and lays the foundation for this practice as it would develop in European painting. The plates are... Learn More
  • 1st Century Colour Palettes

    The sources of pigments used in European painting are found in classical antiquity, and the over 40 pigments in use were described by Theophrastus, Vitruvius, Pliny the Elder, and Dioscorides. The principles of painting were also described by Pliny, to be picked up by Italian Renaissance painters of the 15th century, and they are discussed by the Editor. The pigments in the four extant treatises are described in full which, together with the artistic principles, make this little book a basic primary source for both classical painting and subsequent European painting. This... Learn More

Items 31 to 40 of 91 total

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