A Tale of Two Cities

Charles Dickens

 
Date Published :
December 2016
Publisher :
Classics Illustrated Comics
Contributor(s) :
Joe Orlando, George Evans
Language:
English
Series :
Classics Illustrated
Illustration :
Full color throughout
Format Available    QuantityPrice
Paperback
ISBN : 9781906814618
Pages : 48
Dimensions : 9.5 X 6.5 inches
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+
In stock
$9.95

Overview
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Dickens's classic story of the French Revolution. While the turmoil of the Revolution rages around them, the lives of the members of the Evremonde family are profoundly affected by the actions of one man - Sydney Carton.

Classics Illustrated tells this wonderful tale in colourful comic strip form, offering an excellent introduction for younger readers. This edition also includes theme discussions and study questions, which can be used both in the classroom and at home to further engage the reader in the story.

The Classics Illustrated comic book series began in 1941 with its first issue, Alexandre Dumas's "The Three Musketeers", and has since included over 200 classic tales released around the world. This new CCS Books edition is specifically tailored to engage and educate young readers with some of the greatest works ever written, while still thrilling older readers who have loving memories of this series of old.

About The Author
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Charles Dickens (7 February 1812 - 9 June 1870) is considered the greatest novelist of the Victorian era and created many of the worlds most notable fictional characters, including Fagin, Mr Micawber and Miss Havisham.

JOE ORLANDO was born in Bari, Italy, but his family emigrated to the USA and settled in New York City in 1929. He attended the High School of Industrial Art before being drafted into the Army, where he served in the Military Police in France, Belgium and Germany. Back in civil life, he studied at the Art Students League in New York. He published his first comic, the feature 'Chuck White', in titles like Catholic Comics and Treasure Chest. He then opened a small studio with Wallace Wood, where they were joined by young artists like Sid Check and Harry Harisson. Wood and Orlando worked as a tandem on Fox features like 'Dorothy Lamour', 'Martin Kane', 'Frank Buck', 'Judy Canova' and 'Pedro'.When Fox folded in 1950, the discouraged Orlando went to work at a handbag manufacturer, but was soon brought back to comics by Wood, who could use some help with his heavy workload. They shared art duties on comics for Avon ('An Earth Man on Venus', 'Strange Worlds', 'The Mask of Dr. Fu Manchu'), Youthful Magazines ('Captain Science') and Master Comics ('Dark Mysteries'), as well as EC.At EC, he became a solo artist, and was one of the staples of the New Trend's science fiction titles (Weird Science, Weird Fantasy, Weird Science/Fantasy), especially for the 'Adam Link' stories he made with Otto Binder. Orlando also had stories published in the horror and crime titles, as well as the humor title Panic.When EC stopped publishing comic books in 1956, due to Fredric Wertham's campaign against violent comics, Orlando transferred to Stan Lee's Atlas, working on titles like Mystic and Astonishing. Orlando also contributed art for three issues in Gilberton's Classics Illustrated series, namely 'A Tale of Two Cities', 'Caesar's Conquests' and 'Ben Hur'.In 1957, he went back to EC when he became a regular contributor to Mad magazine, among others by taking over 'Scenes We'd Like to See' from Phil Interlandi. In the mid 1990s, he also worked for Marvel's Daredevil and the James Warren magazines Creepy and Eerie.Orlando joined DC Comics in 1966, initially doing art on 'Swing with Scooter' and 'The Inferior Five', before becoming an editor under Carmen Infantino. Besides editing existing titles like 'House of Mystery' (in which he introduced the hosts Cain and Abel) and 'Swing with Scooter', new titles were created under his helm, such as 'Swamp Thing', 'Phantom Stranger', 'Jonah Hex' and 'The Sandman'. He also co-launched and drew for DC's new humor title PLOP! in 1973, and provided magazine art to National Lampoon and Newsweek. At DC he eventually became Vice President and Editorial Director, and even became head of MAD, after the death of Bill Gaines in 1992. In addition, Orlando was a teacher at New York's School of Visual Arts.

GEORGE EVANS, an artist from Harwood, Pennsylvania, debuted in the illustration field, and attended the Scranton Art School afterwards. After spending three years in the US airforces, he began his career in comics at Fiction House until 1950. There, he worked on among others 'Lost World', 'Senorita Rio', 'Air Heroes' and 'Tigerman'. He was also present at Fawcett, where he worked on 'Captain Marvel', 'Captain Video', 'Bob Colt' and a comic adaptation of the film 'When Worlds Collide'. During this period, he also took courses at the Art Students League in New York.When Fawcett folded, he was brought over to EC Comics by Al Williamson, where he was hired immediately in 1953. Thanks to his technical knowledge of airplanes and machinery, Evans quickly became Kurtzman's favorite on 'Two Fisted Tales' and 'Frontline Combat', yet Evans preferred the freedom of working with Feldstein on the EC horror and SF titles 'The Haunt of Fear' and 'Weird Science'.He also provided striking covers and stories for 'Crime SuspenStories' and 'Shock SupenStories'. In 1955, he drew covers and stories for the "New Direction" aviation title 'Aces High'.When EC collapsed in 1956, he was brought over to Gilberton's 'Classics Illustrated' line. He adapted among others 'Romeo and Juliet', 'The Little Savage', 'Lord Jim', 'The Hunchback of the Notre Dame', and 'The Three Musketeers' to comics. He also did 'Space Conquerors' for Boy's Life magazine.He began collaborations with DC Comics ('Blackhawk') and Gold Key ('Twilight Zone', 'Hercules Unchained') in the early 1960s. He also became George Wunder's assistant on the daily 'Terry and the Pirates', a capacity he held from 1960 to 1973.In 1964 and 1965, he was back in horror comics, with contributions to Warren's Eerie and Creepy. From 1968, he produced various stories about the supernatural for DC Comics. In 1980, he succeeded Archie Goodwin and Al Williamson on 'Secret Agent Corrigan', a series he continued until 1996.During the 1980s and 1990s, he also drew for publishers like Pacific ('Vanguard Illustrated'), Eclipse ('Airboy'), Marvel ('The Nam') and Dark Horse ('Classic Star Wars'), while also illustrating advertising campaigns. He retired in Mount Joy, Pennsylvania, where his final work was doing the 'Flash Gordon' Sunday page on 21 January 2001.

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