A History of Herbalism

Cure, Cook and Conjure

Emma Kay

Food historian Emma Kay tells the story of our centuries-old relationship with herbs.
Date Published :
July 2022
Publisher :
Pen and Sword
Language:
English
Illustration :
Integrated mono images
Format Available    QuantityPrice
Binding : Hardback
ISBN : 9781399008952
Pages : 224
Dimensions : 9.1 X 6.1 inches
Stock Status : In stock
-
+
$34.95
Also available as an ebook:
Buy From Amazon Amazon
Buy From Apple Apple
Buy From Barnes and Noble Barnes & Noble
Buy From Google Google

Casemate will earn a small commission if you buy an ebook after clicking a link here

Overview
-

Food historian Emma Kay tells the story of our centuries-old relationship with herbs. From herbalists of old to contemporary cooking, this book reveals the magical and medicinal properties of your favorite plants in colorful, compelling detail.

At one time, every village in Britain had a herbalist. A History of Herbalism investigates the lives of women and men who used herbs to administer treatment and knew the benefit of each. Meet Dr Richard Shephard of Preston, who cultivated angelica on his estate in the eighteenth century for the sick and injured; or Nicholas Culpeper, a botanist who catalogued the pharmaceutical benefits of herbs for early literary society.

But herbs were not only medicinal. Countless cultures and beliefs as far back as prehistoric times incorporated herbs into their practices: paganism, witchcraft, religion and even astrology. Take a walk through a medieval "physick" garden, or Early Britain, and learn the ancient rituals to fend off evil powers, protect or bewitch or even attract a lover.

The wake of modern medicine saw a shift away from herbal treatments, with rituals and spells shrouded with superstition as the years wore on. The author reveals how herbs became more culinary rather than medicinal including accounts of recent trends for herbal remedies as lockdown and the pandemic leads us to focus more on our health and wellbeing.

About The Author
-

Emma is a post-graduate historian and former senior museum worker. Now, food historian, author and prolific collector of Kitchenalia. She lives in the Cotswolds with her husband and young son. Her articles have appeared in publications including BBC History Magazine, The Daily Express, Daily Mail and Times Literary Supplement. She has contributed historic food research for a number of television production companies and featured several times on Talk Radio Europe, BBC Hereford and Worcester, BBC Coventry and Warwickshire and LifeFM.

In 2018 she appeared in a ten-part series for the BBC and Hungry Gap Productions, 'The Best Christmas Food Ever' and on BBC Countryfile, co-presenting a feature exploring the heritage of the black pear. She has delivered talks for Bath Literature Festival, Stroud Book Festival, 1 Royal Crescent, Bath, The Women’s Institute and Freckleton Library among others.

Emma has had six books published including: Dining with the Georgians (2014), Dining with the Victorians (2015), Cooking up History: Chefs of the Past (2017), Vintage Kitchenalia (2017), More than a Sauce: A Culinary History of Worcestershire (2018), Stinking Bishops and Spotty Pigs: A History of Gloucestershire's Food and Drink (2019). She is currently researching for several new titles.

Emma is a member of The Guild of Food Writers.

More from this publisher